Commentary

From the Executive Editor

By George Chamberlin

Money in the Morning

Most of the time when an official from the Federal Reserve gives a talk, the markets have a negative reaction. But yesterday's appearance on Capitol Hill by chairman Ben Bernanke was filled with cheer and good news. Bernanke told members of the Senate Banking Committee that the U.S. economy continues to grow at a moderate pace but without any inflationary pressures. However, he offered no suggestion when or if the Fed will be ready to cut short-term interest rates. Bernanke today goes before a Congressional committee and the question and answer session may be a bit more aggressive.

Stocks rise after Bernanke comments before Congress, economic data

Stock prices were modestly higher Thursday as investors seemed pleased with the second day of testimony on Capitol Hill by the chairman of the Federal Reserve Board.

Money in the Morning

It's all about Ben Bernanke this morning. The chairman of the Federal Reserve Board went to Capitol Hill today - probably not his favorite task - to discuss current economic conditions. In prepared comments for the Senate Banking Committee, Bernanke said, "So far, the incoming data have supported the view that the current stance of policy is likely to foster sustainable economic growth and a gradual ebbing of core inflation." In other words, the Goldilocks economy continues: not too hot, not too cold, just right.

Stocks advance after Fed's Bernanke says economy growing, inflation will ebb

Stock prices moved higher again Wednesday after Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke told a Senate committee that the U.S. economy is showing moderate growth without any inflationary pressures.

Money in the Morning

The thrill of the deal propelled stocks in 2006 and it looks like more of the same again this year. The mere rumor of a buyout or merger sends a stock soaring and that was the case today. Shares of Alcoa, the 120-year-old aluminum company, are sharply higher after published reports suggested that it may be the target of possible deal with some European rivals.

Wall Street climbs on takeover excitement, Dow Jones industrials gain more than 100 points

Stock prices moved sharply higher Tuesday as investors were excited by the continued pace of merger and acquisition activity. Now investors will wait for Congressional testimony from Federal Reserve Board chairman Ben Bernanke.

Money in the Morning

Despite constant reports to the contrary, U.S. workers are pretty darned happy with their jobs. A survey by Adecco says 85 percent believe their career options are "excellent" as we start 2007. And, 69 percent say they foresee themselves attaining their personal and financial goals based on their current career path. The survey also reinforces the belief that retirement will be different for current workers. Only 25 percent said they believe they will have a traditional retirement and 41 percent say they will continue to work, but with less hours.

Wall Street declines as investors eye failed deals, economic data

Stock prices moved modestly lower Tuesday despite a sharp decline in oil prices. Investors seem to be waiting for economic reports this week in retail sales and home construction.

Money in the Morning

The deal of the day comes from the company that makes Twinkies. Not the snack food but the big yellow buses that take kids back and forth to school. Laidlaw International, which is also the parent company for the Greyhound bus line, is being bought by a British bus company for $2.7 billion. Anyone who has ever seen a bunch of the buses lined up knows why they are called Twinkies.

Money in the Morning

The deal of the day comes from the company that makes Twinkies. Not the snack food but the big yellow buses that take kids back and forth to school. Laidlaw International, which is also the parent company for the Greyhound bus line, is being bought by a British bus company for $2.7 billion. Anyone who has ever seen a bunch of the buses lined up knows why they are called Twinkies.

Stocks fall on inflation worries after Fed officials' comments

Stock prices moved lower Friday. Investors were rattled by comments from two key Federal Reserve officials that higher interest rates may be necessary if there isn't evidence that inflation is under control.

Money in the Morning

More than 5,000 consumer complaints were filed by San Diego County residents last year with the Federal Trade Commission. The most complaints related to shop-at-home and catalog sales, followed by Internet service and computer complaints, as well as Internet auctions, prize sweepstakes and lotteries. On a nationwide level, identity theft continued to dominate the list of complaints filed with the FTC. Surprisingly, that didn't even make it into the top five in San Diego.

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George Chamberlin

GEORGE CHAMBERLIN has been associated with The Daily Transcript at SDDT.com since 1998 and became Executive Editor in 2006. He is responsible for the development of editorial strategies for the newspaper ...

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