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Scientists at UCSD awarded early concept grants from NSF

UC San Diego anounced Monday that four of its scientists are among the 36 recipients nationwide who have been awarded early concept grants for brain research from the National Science Foundation.

The four UCSD principal investigators to receive the awards were assistant professor of biology Brenda Bloodgood, cognitive studies associate professor Andrea Chiba, physics professor David Kleinfeld and Charles Stevens, professor of molecular neurobiology at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

Specific projects to benefit from the grants include: Bloodgood's project, “A Novel Toolkit for Imaging Transcription in vivo;" Chibas's project titled “Socially Situated Neuroscience: Creating a Suite of Tools for Studying Sociality and Interoception;" Kleinfeld's “Closed Loop Computing in the Brainstem" project and Stevens' project "A Proposed New Principle of Brain Organization.”

Each of the awards will provide the projects with $300,000 over a two-year period to “develop a range of conceptual and physical tools," according to the NSF.

The 36 grants, which total $10.8 million, are intended to “enable new technologies to better understand how complex behaviors emerge from the activity of brain circuits."

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