PUBLIC NOTICES
Published In The Daily Transcript
Advertised public notices, printed in a newspaper of general circulation, are required by California law. Within the individual category, notices are arranged by print publish day in reverse chronological order.
Online, on a selected date, the notices are arranged in alphabetical order.

Miscellaneous Notices
PUBLISHED: Friday September 03, 2010

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
OFFICIAL NOTICE
IN THE CITY OF SAN DIEGO
FOR THE COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO
PLEASE READ IMMEDIATELY
PROCLAMATION OF AN ERADICATION PROJECT AGAINST THE
LIGHT BROWN APPLE MOTH


The light brown apple moth (LBAM), a serious exotic insect pest, was detected in the City of San Diego, San Diego County, between July 27 and August 4, 2010. The LBAMis not known to occur in California. This pest attacks over 250 different hosts, many of which are grown in San Diego County. Emergency eradication action is needed toprotect California from the negative economic and environmental impacts the establishment of this pest would cause.

The California Department of Food and Agriculture's eradication protocol is based upon input from professional staff and recommendations from expert scientists on a LBAMTechnical Working Group.

A technique called mating disruption will be used to eradicate LBAM in the City of San Diego. This technique requires the deployment of pheromone-infused dispensers byground. The pheromone dispensers are placed on trees, shrubs and objects such as fence posts in infested areas. The pheromone dispensers contain an odorless, syntheticinsect pheromone (sexual attractant) that confuses male moths, impairing their ability to find mates. Once the breeding cycle of the moth is broken, the light brown apple mothpopulation is reduced and ultimately eradicated from the area. Pheromone dispenser applications target the adult male moth and preclude pesticide spraying, unless immature(larval) life stages are detected. Residents in the affected area will be notified prior to any deployment of pheromone dispensers on their property.

In the City of San Diego, six moths were captured. This is a strong indication that a breeding population exists in the area. If additional LBAM or other life stages of the LBAMare detected, additional eradication measures will occur within a 200-meter radius of the find sites. Following any eradication activity, completion notices are left with theresidents detailing precautions to take. Mating disruption technique will be repeated every 90 days for two life cycles.

Enclosed are the Proclamation of an Eradication Project, the maps of the eradication area, the work plan, the pest profile and the host list.


PROCLAMATION OF AN ERADICATION PROJECT
REGARDING THE LIGHT BROWN APPLE MOTH


On February 6, 2007, the California Department of Food and Agriculture (Department) was informed that two light brown apple moths (LBAM) were detected in a light traplocated in Berkeley. This trap is maintained by a retired entomologist. The samples were sent to an Australian entomologist who confirmed that the specimens were Epiphyaspostvittana (Walker), the light brown apple moth. These were the first detections of LBAM in the continental United States. In response to these detections, additional trapswere placed throughout the state in spring 2007. Upon inspection of the LBAM traps between July 27 and August 4, 2010, six LBAM were detected in the City of San Diego,San Diego County.

Based on trapping data, the LBAM having a continuous life cycle with no true dormancy, the ability of LBAM larvae to disperse via the wind on silken threads, an exponentialreproduction rate, recommendations from the LBAM Technical Working Group and information provided to me by my staff, I have determined that an established infestation ofthis pest exists.

The light brown apple moth is a pest to ornamental plants and agricultural crops. It is native to Australia, and has become established in New Zealand, New Caledonia, Hawaii,and the British Isles. It was estimated for Australia that LBAM causes AU$21.1 million annually in lost production and control costs. If the LBAM becomes established inCalifornia, this pest will devastate residential landscapes and agriculture. The LBAM attacks over 250 hosts. It attacks nearly all types of fruit crops, ornamentals, vegetablesand nursery stock. Hosts occurring in California that are of significant concern include: apple, apricot, avocado, broccoli, camellia, chrysanthemum, citrus, cottonwood, cypress,dahlia, ferns, geranium, grape, honeysuckle, kiwi, oak, peach, rose, spruce, strawberry and willow. LBAM causes economic damage from feeding by the larvae. The pestdestroys stunts or deforms young seedlings; spoils the appearance of ornamental plants; and injures deciduous fruit tree crops. During severe outbreaks, damage to fruit maybe as high as 85 percent of the crop. Losses in crop production and the cost to control the LBAM are estimated to be $160-$640 million annually in the current infested area.

Based upon the known climatic zones of infested origins, and the distribution of similar climatic zones in California, it is likely that the pest will successfully adapt to the climateof this state if the infestation is not eradicated.

Establishment of the LBAM could cause direct environmental damage via increased pesticide use statewide by commercial and residential growers and via adverse feedingimpacts on native plants. Populations of threatened and endangered plant species could be severely threatened or extirpated should this moth adapt to feeding on them.

As Secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, I have decided based upon the possible economic and environmental damage that could be inflicted by anestablished infestation of the LBAM, that under my statutory authority, it is incumbent on me to attempt to eradicate the LBAM and its life stages in California.

This decision to proceed with an eradication program is based upon a realistic evaluation. It may be possible to prevent the establishment and the spread of the LBAM usingcurrently available technology in a manner that is recommended by the LBAM Technical Working Group.

My duty to act, and this decision, is based upon authority set forth in Section 3591.20 of Title 3 of the California Code of Regulations (CCR), Sections 401.5, 403, 407, 408,5401-5404, and specifically 5761-5763 of the Food and Agricultural Code.

The following is a list of options that I have considered for the eradication of the LBAM in the City of San Diego, San Diego County: 1) foliar application of an organic pesticideby ground; 2) mating disruption using pheromone-infused dispensers; 3) release of stingless parasitic wasps; and 4) quarantine measures.

Based upon input from my professional staff and recommendations from experts familiar with the LBAM, I am ordering the deployment of pheromone-infused dispensers beapplied by ground to LBAM hosts within a 200-meter radius around all detection sites. A description of the options chosen is contained in the attached work plan. In issuing thisdecision, I have considered pesticidal and non-pesticidal options. The option selected is a biological control measure that involves the use of a synthetic insect pheromone(sexual attractant) that confuses male moths, impairing their ability to find mates. This option was selected based upon minimal public intrusiveness, cost effectiveness, andminimal impacts to the environment.

Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA") (Pubic Resources Code, § 21000 et seq.) and the State CEQA Guidelines (Title 14 CCR § 15000 et seq.), theCalifornia Department of Food and Agriculture is the lead agency with jurisdiction over agricultural pest issues. An Environmental Impact Report (EIR) has been prepared forthe LBAM project in accordance with Public Resources Code, Sections 21002, 21002.1, and 21081 et seq. The LBAM Program EIR was certified by the Secretary of CDFA onMarch 22, 2010.


Sensitive Areas

The eradication zone has been examined and the Department is aware of the sensitive environmental and cultural sites that encompass the treatment area. Mitigationmeasures will be implemented to guard against contamination of these sensitive sites. The Department will not apply pesticides to water bodies, riparian habitat areas or areaslacking host plants. The Department will also not apply pesticides to schools, day care centers, nursing homes, and hospitals.

Eradication Plan

The proposed eradication area encompasses an area within the City of San Diego, San Diego County, which falls within approximately 0.10 square miles. If additional LBAMare detected outside of the eradication zone, the area will expand as necessary. The maps of the find sites with the eradication boundary are attached. In summary form, theeradication plan consists of the following elements:


  1. Trapping - Jackson traps baited with the LBAM pheromone lure will be placed in the treatment area at the density of 100 traps per square mile (core) where LBAM hasbeen detected; and 25 traps per square mile in the eight square miles adjacent to the core. Additional traps may be added to further delimit the infestation and to determine theefficacy of treatments. All monitoring traps will be serviced on a regular schedule for a period of time equal to three generations beyond the date of the last LBAM detection.

  2. Treatment - Ground applications with pheromone-infused dispensers placed on trees, shrubs and objects such as fence posts on designated residential properties within a200 meter radius of each detection property. The pheromone dispensers contain an odorless, synthetic insect pheromone (sexual attractant) that confuses male moths,impairing their ability to find mates. Once the breeding cycle of the moth is broken, the light brown apple moth population is reduced and ultimately eradicated from the area. Residents in the affected area will be notified in writing prior the deployment of the pheromone dispensers.

  3. Post-Treatment Monitoring - Light brown apple moth traps will be inspected for one life cycle following the last deployment of the pheromone dispensers.

  4. Quarantine - The official detection of any life stage of LBAM will trigger a quarantine or expansion of an existing quarantine boundary. The quarantine boundaries will bedeveloped in association with local regulatory authorities.


  5. All regulated entities, such as nurseries, landscapers, packing houses and green waste handlers will be identified, informed of the quarantine restrictions and placed undercompliance agreement. Quarantine compliance inspections will be conducted as necessary in all quarantine areas to ensure ongoing compliance with quarantine restrictions.




NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT A
MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION
FOR THE PIPELINES 3 & 4 RELINING PROJECT -
STATE ROUTE 52 TO LAKE MURRAY AND
PIPELINE 3 3O-INCH INTERCONNECT
TO LAKE MURRAY CONTROL VALVE
---
The San Diego County Water Authority (Water Authority), as the lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), has prepared and plans to adopt a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) for the Pipelines 3 & 4 Relining Project - State Route (SR) 52 to Lake Murray and Pipeline 3 30-inch Interconnect to Lake Murray Control Valve. This notice is intended to notify agencies and members of the public that may be interested in the project as to the availability of the MND, and the procedures for public review and comment on the MND.
Project Title: Mitigated Negative Declaration for the Pipelines 3 & 4 Relining Project - State Route (SR) 52 to Lake Murray and Pipeline 3 30-inch Interconnect to Lake Murray Control Valve
Project Applicant: San Diego County Water Authority
State Clearinghouse Number: None Yet Assigned
Project Location: The pipeline to be rehabilitated extends from a point immediately north of State Route 52, to the south along the eastern edge of the community of Tierrasanta and through Mission Trails Regional Park (MTRP) and Mission Gorge, before ending in the southern portion of MTRP near the northeast side of Lake Murray (Pipeline 4) and in Baltimore Drive (Pipeline 3) where it passes through this portion of MTRP in the community of San Carlos, in the City and County of San Diego, California.
Project Description: The proposed project consists of rehabilitation of approximately 19,200 linear feet of existing Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) along the existing Water Authority Pipeline 4 (16,600 feet) and Pipeline 3 (2,600 feet). The proposed project would rehabilitate Pipelines 3 and 4 through installation of a steel liner into the existing PCCP along two non-continuous segments of the pipelines. Thirteen temporary pipeline access portals would be constructed as part of the proposed project. In addition to the planned portals, access to the pipelines also would take place through up to 18 existing manhole structures and two temporary access shafts along the length of the project alignment.
Probable Environmental Effects: The MND identified potentially significant impacts to biological resources as well as environmental impacts from construction noise. Mitigation measures, as described in the MND, have been incorporated into the project that either eliminate the project's impacts or reduce them to less than significant levels.
Availability of Document: Pursuant to CEQA, the Draft MND is being made available for a 30-day public review period, which is to commence on September 3, 2010 and end on October 2, 2010. The Draft MND and the supporting technical appendices are available for review at the offices of the San Diego County Water Authority, 4677 Overland Avenue, San Diego, CA 92123. The Draft MND and appendices are also available for review and downloading from the Water Authority's website: http://www.sdcwa.org. Additional copies may also be viewed at the following locations:
Tierrasanta Branch Library
4985 La Cuenta Drive
San Diego, CA 92124
City of San Diego Public Library
Government Publications Library
820 E Street
San Diego, CA 92101
San Carlos Branch Library
7265 Jackson Drive
San Diego, CA 92119
Allied Gardens/Benjamin Branch Library
5188 Zion Avenue
San Diego, CA 92120
Public Hearing: A public hearing to take testimony on the adequacy of the Draft MND will be held on September 23, 2010 before the Water Authority's Water Planning Committee at the San Diego County Water Authority, 4677 Overland Avenue, San Diego, CA. Persons wishing to present oral comments should check the Water Authority's website (http://www.sdcwa.org) beginning one week prior to the scheduled hearing date to confirm the anticipated start time of the Water Planning Committee meeting. A Final MND, incorporating public input, will be prepared for consideration by the Water Authority at a future public meeting.
Comments: The Water Authority will be accepting written comments regarding the Draft MND. Written comments should be directed to the Water Authority's environmental consultant, HELIX Environmental Planning, Inc., 7578 El Cajon Blvd., Suite 200, La Mesa, CA 91941. Comments should be received no later than October 2, 2010. For additional information regarding the environmental review for this project, please email Mark Tegio, Sr. at mtegio@sdcwa.org.
Pub. September 03-00078743


Miscellaneous Notices
PUBLISHED: Friday September 03, 2010


Browse By Publication Date Months in 2010 Days in September 2010
2010 Public Notices
September
09/03/2010