Law Week 2004 - Thursday - National litigation practices

The Daily Transcript celebrates Law Week 2004 with our annual week-long series honoring the business of law and the legal system. Today, we focus on national litigation practices.

  • Quattrone's appeal will focus on judge's rulings

    [IMAGE=quattrone_frank.jpg CAPTION= Former Credit Suisse First Boston banker Frank Quattrone, left, and his lawyer John Keker, leave the federal courthouse in New York, May 3. Quattrone was found guilty of obstructing investigations of IPOs by urging bankers to discard records after learning of the probes.

  • Casino tribe sovereignty may have limits

    For years, California's casino Indian tribes have used the sovereignty afforded them under federal law and several treaties to flout this state's environmental laws, prevent local cops from making arrests on reservations and avoid taxes on almost all their estimated $5 billion per year in gambling receipts.

  • Secrets exposed! Hillary, Paula and now Dick?

    U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney would be having an easier time of it in court right now if it hadn't been for those pesky people who kept suing the Clinton White House.

  • Pillsbury Winthrop boasts 30 litigation specializations

    Pillsbury Winthrop's litigation practice includes a team of over 300 trial lawyers on both coasts and abroad, with the depth and breadth to assist clients throughout all stages of litigation. The firm has over 30 litigation specialty practices to meet the varied needs of its clients. These specialty practice areas include antitrust and trade regulation; biotech and pharmaceuticals; commercial disputes; corporate investigations and white collar defense; creditors' rights, lender liability, bankruptcy, and insurance insolvency; employment and labor relations; energy; ERISA and employee benefits; health care; intellectual property, patents, copyrights and trademarks; international; Internet; maritime; media, entertainment and sports; mergers and acquisitions; real property; securities and derivatives; tax; trade secrets; trusts and estates; and, unfair business/consumer practices.

  • Prosecutors request anonymous jury in Enron trial

    HOUSTON (AP) - Fallout from the recent Tyco mistrial after a juror was publicly identified during deliberations has reached at least one upcoming criminal trial stemming from Enron Corp.'s scandalous implosion.

  • Pro bono program provides hope for hundreds of families

  • U.S. Supreme Court: It's OK to discriminate against younger employees

    In General Dynamics Land System, Inc. v. Cline, the U.S. Supreme Court recently held that the Age Discrimination and Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) cannot be used by younger employees to claim discrimination when the employer favors older employees, even when those younger employees are within the age group protected by the ADEA (40 and older).

  • The future of the Patriot Act

  • California's challenge to employers: Are you tough enough?

    You know, it could be worse. Suppose your poorly performing, soon-to-be terminated transgender employee complains that meal and lunch periods are not being observed ... and then informs you that personal time off is needed for a partner's medical problem, but there are concerns that the company's health plan fails to provide proper minimum coverage, in violation of state law.

  • Managing legal risk globally

  • Litigation firm brings commitment, satisfaction and national clients

  • Fish & Richardson: Leaders of the pack

    When corporate American was asked to name the attorneys they utilize the most, Fish & Richardson's name came up time and again, making the firm one of the "Leaders of the Pack" -- one of the law firms the Fortune 250 turns to most often for legal counsel. The nationwide law firm has a long history of litigating complicated patent and business disputes involving the most cutting-edge technologies. The firm's San Diego office includes many of the nation's most notable trial lawyers.

  • McKenna Long & Aldridge's legal solutions stay ahead of the curve

    McKenna Long & Aldridge LLP is an international, full-service law firm comprising approximately 375 lawyers and public policy advisers with offices in Atlanta, Brussels, Denver, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Diego, San Francisco and Washington, D.C. Our attorneys provide the critical industry knowledge and quality of service that today's clients demand from their law firm. Our clients include numerous Fortune 500 firms, mid-size companies, major government contractors and nonprofit organizations of all types.

  • A lifetime in court and around the world

    Richard Gerry's phone rang sometime between 2 a.m. and 3 a.m. March 24, 1989. It was his law partner in Kenai, Alaska, calling to say the Exxon Valdez oil tanker had run aground on a well-charted reef just after midnight, spilling 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound.

  • Prosecutors get additional time for decision on Qwest execs' retrial

    DENVER (AP) - The government was given an additional two weeks Friday to decide whether to retry two former Qwest executives whose fraud cases ended in a mistrial.

  • Judge gives former Rite Aid CEO eight more days

    HARRISBURG, Pa. -- A federal judge on Thursday gave former Rite Aid Corp. (NYSE: RAD) chief executive Martin L. Grass eight days to decide whether to withdraw his guilty plea in an accounting scandal at the pharmacy chain.

  • Weighing the threats to country, civil liberties

    What exactly is a patriot? This term seems to be one of the themes utilized by both presidential candidates this year. President Bush has recently announced that the Patriot Act needs to be made permanent, to protect our country from terrorist threats. Major elements of the Patriot Act are set to expire at the end of next year, and the president feels that the act must be reinstated permanently.

  • Prosecutors urge no new trial for Stewart, broker

    NEW YORK -- Federal prosecutors on April 26 again urged a judge to deny Martha Stewart and her ex-stockbroker a new trial, disputing a claim that the first trial was tainted when the jury discussed Stewart's expensive handbag.

  • Federal judge allows Sprint to sue county over wireless ordinance

    Federal District Judge Judith Keep in San Diego recently handed a victory to Sprint PCS that could change the national legal landscape in disputes between wireless carriers and municipalities.

  • Legislation would put new restrictions on personal injury lawyers

    The San Diego Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse is backing new legislation that would prohibit personal injury lawyers from making unsolicited contact with a potential client for at least 45 days after an accident. The bill was introduced in the state Assembly by Patricia Bates, R-Laguna Niguel, Feb. 19 and has been referred to the Judiciary Committee.

  • Unlawful attorney advertising and solicitation: Who is liable?

    Attorney advertising and solicitation are covered by California State Bar Rule 1-400, as well as California Business and Professions Code Section 6152. Code section 6152 states that it is unlawful for "runners" and "cappers" to solicit business for attorneys. Also prohibited by this section is soliciting or joining in this type of conduct. (BP 6152 (a)(2).) A violation of this section may result in criminal penalties including potential incarceration and/ or fines as high as $15,000. (BP 6153.)

  • Unlawful attorney advertising and solicitation

    An attorney's quest to generate business and the procurement of clients may involve efforts not only by the attorney, but also by their agents or employees. In addition to California State Bar Rule 1-400, which governs attorney advertising and solicitation, such activity is also addressed in the California Business and Professions Code, Section 6152.

National News

  • Quattrone's appeal will focus on judge's rulings

    [IMAGE=quattrone_frank.jpg CAPTION= Former Credit Suisse First Boston banker Frank Quattrone, left, and his lawyer John Keker, leave the federal courthouse in New York, May 3. Quattrone was found guilty of obstructing investigations of IPOs by urging bankers to discard records after learning of the probes.

  • Prosecutors request anonymous jury in Enron trial

    HOUSTON (AP) - Fallout from the recent Tyco mistrial after a juror was publicly identified during deliberations has reached at least one upcoming criminal trial stemming from Enron Corp.'s scandalous implosion.

  • Prosecutors get additional time for decision on Qwest execs' retrial

    DENVER (AP) - The government was given an additional two weeks Friday to decide whether to retry two former Qwest executives whose fraud cases ended in a mistrial.

  • Judge gives former Rite Aid CEO eight more days

    HARRISBURG, Pa. -- A federal judge on Thursday gave former Rite Aid Corp. (NYSE: RAD) chief executive Martin L. Grass eight days to decide whether to withdraw his guilty plea in an accounting scandal at the pharmacy chain.

  • Prosecutors urge no new trial for Stewart, broker

    NEW YORK -- Federal prosecutors on April 26 again urged a judge to deny Martha Stewart and her ex-stockbroker a new trial, disputing a claim that the first trial was tainted when the jury discussed Stewart's expensive handbag.

Containing Report