From the general contractors and engineers to the prime contractors, subcontractors and suppliers, we'll explore the faces behind the scenes of construction projects. This section is supported by the Engineering & General Contractors Association.

  • Coronado medical building under construction

    Construction has begun on a new 24,000-square-foot retail, office and medical building at the intersection of "B" Avenue and Ynez Street in Coronado. Farshad and Farzad Yaghouti are developing the project. White Construction is the general contractor. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 2007.

  • Reno Contracting nearing completion of Intuit corporate headquarters at Kilroy Santa Fe Summit

    Reno Contracting Inc. is constructing the Intuit regional headquarters for the Kilroy Realty Corp..

  • Fegley upholds Reno philosophy of quality construction, client satisfaction

    Born and raised in the greater Philadelphia area, Walter J. Fegley attended Kutztown State College in upstate Pennsylvania. He started in construction in 1971, working for a commercial masonry and concrete contractor. He then moved to Colorado in 1973 to become a masonry and concrete contractor.

  • Creativity, flexibility crucial to developers' risk management programs

    Developers of residential construction are faced with changing their business models to sync up with the future of the housing market. "Like every part of our business, we need to be more creative with our insurance and risk management," said one local developer's in-house risk management counsel. "What worked in the past may not be the way to proceed in the future."

  • Finding the right commercial real estate lender

    Building, remodeling or purchasing commercial real estate is expensive, and financing is a necessary part of making those investments a reality. Savvy developers, realtors and executives know the right business banker is the critical link to providing solutions for what are oftentimes complex lending issues.

  • Cost segregation studies can drastically increase your business' bottom line today!

    Cost segregation is an IRS approved method of reclassifying components and improvements of a commercial building from real to personal property. This process allows the assets to be depreciated on a five-, seven-, or 15-year schedule instead of the traditional 27.5- or 39-year depreciation schedule of real property. Thus, your current taxable income will be greatly reduced and your cash flow will increase and -- even better - it's retroactive to 1986. Found cash that belongs to you!

  • Pacific Building's Rogers combines experience with service

    Pacific Building Group's CEO Greg Rogers has more than 30 years experience in every level of commercial construction. Upon graduating from San Diego's Hoover High School 1968, Rogers embarked on a career in construction after completing an apprenticeship with the District Council Carpenters.

  • Winning in mediation

    A dispute has arisen on your construction project. A claim has been initiated and the owner and the contractor dig out their copy of the contract that was long ago filed. They look through the American Institute of Architects (AIA) General Conditions of their contract (AIA Document A201-1997) to see how the claim must be handled. It is then that they realize that section 4.5.1 of the General Conditions requires them to mediate the claim as a condition precedent to arbitration or the institution of legal or equitable proceedings by either party.

  • Quality assurance is key for builders to become more profitable

    "Many builders are talking about their quality initiatives. We have great people and few complaints, so how do I know if our company is doing everything we can to limit risk?"

  • The roofing renaissance

    Are you aware of what is happening in the roofing industry these days? Change is happening all around us, and it is affecting every roof owner.

  • Business owner fined for failing to register -- wasn't told

    Two years ago a Sacramento couple, Amber and Ken Parsons, sold their home and plowed the equity into their dream business, Performance Concrete Pumping Inc. They purchased a new trailer-mounted 2004 transcrete concrete pump from Ricker's Machinery in Oakland for $45,000. "We buy new equipment because it gives us less problems," Amber Parsons recently told Dan Fauchier, public works liaison for the San Diego Engineering & General Contractors Association (EGCA). "We have liability insurance, workers comp, all our licenses; we try to do everything above board," Parsons added.

  • 'Wrong formula' promises higher construction costs

    New off road diesel emissions regulations about to be enacted by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) utilize "some new formula completely different than the Moyer formula we've been working with for years," Sukut Equipment Inc. President Mike Ortiz recently reported in EGCA Magazine, a publication of the local Engineering & General Contractors Association (EGCA).

  • 'The polluter pays,' says CARB exec

    "Boundless energy, tremendous talent, a passion for clean air," were words used to describe Catherine Witherspoon when she was appointed executive officer of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) in 2003, the board's first woman executive officer. Except for a year running a private consulting firm in 1998, Witherspoon has spent the last quarter century in the public sector working on air pollution issues, mostly with CARB.

  • State notification efforts a failure, says industry

    Construction-related businesses that utilize portable engines -- power generators, pumps, compressors, diesel pile-driving hammers, welders, cranes and woodchippers -- were required to register their engines by Dec. 31, 2005, or risk fines of $10,000 per engine per day, according to the California Air Resources Board (CARB).

  • Contractors brace for 'Category 5' storm of regulations

    "We have a Category 5 challenge bearing down on the construction industry. It can make obsolete 90 percent of the equipment in use today. The biggest asset most construction companies have is their equipment, and much of that is about to become worthless," consultant Jim Burton recently warned members of the Engineering & General Contractors Association (EGCA).

  • Construction challenges: DiamondView Tower finds the solutions

    When building a Class A office tower, anticipating the needs of users makes the building more attractive to potential tenants and avoids costly changes and additions down the line. But how does a developer determine what dozens of companies, hundreds of workers, several retailers, a few restaurants and perhaps even a fitness center will want and need? As tenants sign leases to buildings under construction, how can a developer adapt the project to each tenant's specific usage requirements?

  • Change orders -- the bane of all construction projects

    More disputes arise and more adversarial positions are staked out because of actual or perceived changes in a construction project than for any other reason. Aggressive contractors will threaten slowdowns and work stoppages if they don't get paid. Overbearing owners will insist that unknown conditions, extra features and an expanded project are covered by the original bid price.

  • Bonita flood control project gets $3 million federal grant

    Congressman Bob Filner and Supervisor Greg Cox announced Wednesday funding through the Hazard Mitigation Grant program worth $2,932,500 for flood control improvements to Central Avenue near Bonita Road in the Bonita-Sunnyside community.

  • California infrastructure gets poor report card from engineers

    The California chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers released its infrastructure report card Wednesday, using its own analysis of the state’s infrastructure as a stump from which to promote ballot measures.

  • San Diego construction permits for August lowest in more than three years

    While the number of permits pulled in San Diego County for residential construction so far this year represents the lowest first eight-month total in more than three years, the total value of all construction has remained comparable to the previous three years because of the volume of nonresidential construction and the value of residential permits.

  • Border fence likely to offer contracting opportunities

    It’s unlikely that plans for building an extended border fence will be made before the proposal passes through the Senate. But should the bill pass, construction will probably be done by the private sector, authorities said.

  • Proposed post-9/11 building structural changes are not an issue in San Diego

    In the wake of 9/11 and the collapse of the two World Trade Center towers, building design and construction have been put under the microscope in an effort to find stronger building methods and techniques. Now, more than five years after 9/11, the changes to building design and construction appear to be minimal in San Diego County, with the exception of government structures.

  • Green building, sustainability are fast-rising concepts in architecture

    Green building and environmental sustainability are fast-rising concepts in architecture in San Diego and statewide. And although those concepts are mostly a matter of common sense, businesses and the public need to be educated.

  • Even as construction declines, contractor associations say more workers needed

    Even though the total value of permits pulled so far this year for commercial, residential and remodeling construction in San Diego County is below previous years, contractor associations are stressing that there still are not enough qualified and skilled construction professionals to meet current building levels.

  • Engineering company presence on campuses would aid student recruitment

    As a new school year starts and college students move closer to graduation, engineering students at San Diego colleges said they look for their first jobs at companies that make themselves easily accessible.

  • Most observers see moderate price hikes for construction materials

    Ask those in the San Diego County construction industry about construction material costs and you'll hear some say prices have stabilized for the most part, while others continue to see further increases that will continue in the future.

  • From Big Dig to big digs -- a home made from scrap

    LEXINGTON, Mass. -- It's over budget, Paul Pedini says of his Big Dig house, but at least "it doesn't leak."

  • University program promotes engineering to Alaska Natives

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- It was strange, Herb Schroeder thought, that after a year of working on water projects with Alaska Natives from dozens of villages, he had not met a single engineer who was Native.

Profiles

National News

Archived Reports

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering - 2013

Take a closer look at some of the people involved in the development of our region and some current projects.

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering - 2012

Take a closer look at some of the executives and firms involved in the development of our region.

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering - 2011

Take a closer look at some of the people involved in the development of our region and their current projects.

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering - 2010

Take a closer look at some of the executives and firms involved in the development of our region, from general contractors and engineers to designers, subcontractors and suppliers.

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering - 2009

This special report focuses on the players helping to build San Diego -- from general contractors and engineers to prime contractors, subcontractors and suppliers.

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering - 2008

Take a closer look at some of the leading construction and engineering firms involved in the development of our region.

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering - 2007

Take a closer look at some of the people involved in the development of our region and their current projects.

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering - 2005

From the general contractors and engineers to the prime contractors, subcontractors and suppliers -- in this section, we explore the relationships between these parties, how they work together and which companies are working on which projects.

Who's Who in Construction & Engineering

From the general contractors and engineers, to the prime contractors, subcontractors and suppliers -- in this report, The Daily Transcript will explore the relationships between these parties, how they work together and which companies are working on which projects.