This special section highlights local health care leaders, trends in health care programs, new facilities, emerging treatments, legal matters and more.

  • SKCC director working to improve prostate cancer diagnosis

    When a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, he should not have to undergo surgery and chemotherapy if the malignant cells in his prostate gland more than likely will be slow growing and not spread to create other malignancies in his body.

  • San Ysidro Health Center CEO advocates for uninsured

    Ed Martinez takes his role of health care visionary and advocate seriously, and that's good news for the San Diego's South Bay population served by San Ysidro Health Clinic.

  • San Diego Center for Children tends to kids' emotional, behavioral health

    To Edwin Kofler, a fundamental cornerstone of a healthy society is that the behavioral health and emotional well being of every child and adolescent in the community are ensured. Kofler is the CEO of the San Diego Center for Children, an organization he came to 10 years ago after 17 years in administration at Scripps Health.

  • Local fertility specialist and researcher passionate about helping build families

    When Samuel H. Wood, M.D., Ph.D., began practicing medicine, he was driven by the passion to help intended parents realize their dream of growing a family.

  • Sharp Health Plan president and CEO committed to community

    Melissa Hayden Cook, president and chief executive officer of Sharp Health Plan, was born in San Diego at Sharp Memorial and raised in La Jolla. As a proud San Diegan, Hayden Cook's mission is to reach out to the community. Her ambition to connect the community with the right care at the right time, in a cost-effective and personalized manner, is reflected in the way she utilizes Sharp Health Plan's unique relationship as a subsidiary of Sharp HealthCare, San Diego's largest integrated health care system.

  • New long-term acute care facility fills health care void

    When doctors admit their patients to a long-term acute care (LTAC) hospital, it is with good reason and multiple benefits.

  • Pre-hospital care: Caregiver training saves lives

    As new technologies and treatment options continue to change health care, the importance of ongoing training for paramedics and emergency medical technicians has become a critical element in providing quality pre-hospital care.

  • Bush vetoes embryonic stem cell bill, urges research on other stem cell lines

    WASHINGTON -- Vetoing a stem cell bill for the second time, President Bush on Wednesday sought to placate those who disagree with him by signing an executive order urging scientists toward what he termed "ethically responsible" research in the field.

  • Getting a discount on plastic surgery

    Face-lifts, tummy tucks, nose jobs and other cosmetic surgeries cost thousands of dollars that health insurance doesn't cover. But some health plans are now offering a new type of benefit -- access to a list of plastic surgeons who have agreed to reduce their fees.

  • AMA, Wall Street tap into doctors' collective insight via new Web service

    BOSTON -- The American Medical Association is working with a startup company that encourages doctors to swap ideas online and charges investment firms to view postings that could serve as tip-offs to drug side effects and other market-moving medical trends.

  • Can motion sensors, online memory tests help predict Alzheimer's earlier?

    WASHINGTON -- Tiny motion sensors are attached to the walls, doorways and even the refrigerator of Elaine Bloomquist's home, tracking the seemingly healthy 86-year-old's daily activity.

  • AMN Healthcare dedicated to the future of health care

    AMN Healthcare Inc. is the largest temporary health care staffing company in the United States. AMN Healthcare's combined nursing, physician, pharmacist and allied health network provides a total staffing solution for acute-care hospitals, physician practice groups and other health care facilities throughout California and the nation.

  • Be a better communicator: How patient-centered communication can reduce medical malpractice risk

    Listen up physicians: Don't want to take the time to communicate effectively with your patients? It may cost you.

  • Third-party reproduction demands specialization

    If you are a family law attorney, physician or health care practitioner dealing with someone considering utilizing third-party reproduction and IVF to create a family, you must make certain that they are represented by an attorney that concentrates exclusively in this area and who has the experience to back up their advice.

  • Less invasive surgery techniques shorten recovery time

    Whether it's the constant up and down of sitting at a desk or the weekly golf outing, most business professionals deal with some sort of joint pain. Every year in the United States, joint afflictions lead to over 400,000 knee replacements and 300,000 hip replacements as age, activity and injuries take their toll. While the baby boomer population ages, minimally invasive surgical techniques are beginning to provide options to patients for pain treatment, with significant improvements in patient recovery time and overall success.

  • Health care no longer political minefield

    WASHINGTON -- During the 13 years since President Bill Clinton lost his bid to remake the U.S. health-care system, and helped cost his party control of Congress in the bargain, politicians have shied from changing it more than one step at a time even as costs and the ranks of uninsured have ballooned.

  • Alternative medicine not quite mainstream in health care

    Alternative, by definition, means not of the mainstream. And although alternative health therapies have certainly made their way out of the fringe in usage and awareness -- from yoga's use by high school football teams to Deepak Chopra's increased prominence -- these practices are still largely secondary to traditional medicine in the health care arena.

  • Higher costs, demand for care some culprits behind ailing health care system

    The health care system could use a little tender loving care, at least so say about a half-dozen field professionals who gathered for a recent Transcript roundtable to discuss issues surrounding the industry.

  • Invitrogen gives 'green light' to stem cell research

    A stem cell line launched Friday by Carlsbad-based Invitrogen Corp. will allow scientific researchers the ability to discern cell differences with the aid of a green glow.

  • Medical offices at Bressi

    Urban West, a Santa Ana-based developer, announced it has purchased a 1.94 acre parcel on the corner of El Camino Real and Town Garden Road in Bressi Ranch and is seeking approvals to rezone the parcel to develop Bressi Ranch Medical Plaza.

  • Meet Tim: Medics' realistic mannequin breathes new life into the term 'dummy'

    Quick response times and agile teamwork can help save lives in the event of a life-threatening emergency. But classroom teachings rarely capture the scope of real-life situations.

  • Life sciences community reports on FDA approval progress

    A study released Wednesday by Biocom and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP revealed that although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has made strides with improved guidance, expectations and approvals, the industry remains concerned about a number of regulatory challenges.

  • Palomar Pomerado prepares to build 'hospital of the future'

    By the time Palomar Pomerado Health welcomes patients to its newly built Escondido hospital four years from now, it will have experimented with surgical robots, real-time patient information displayed on hand-held devices and plates made of corn.

  • Nursing homes spend millions of dollars to reinvent themselves

    HATBORO, Pa. -- John Smyth needed more than the big flat-screen TV, towel warmers and homelike furniture offered at the Willow Ridge Center to convince him to stay in the nursing home's rehab unit following knee-joint replacement.

Who's Who in Health Care

Profiles

National News

  • Bush vetoes embryonic stem cell bill, urges research on other stem cell lines

    WASHINGTON -- Vetoing a stem cell bill for the second time, President Bush on Wednesday sought to placate those who disagree with him by signing an executive order urging scientists toward what he termed "ethically responsible" research in the field.

  • Getting a discount on plastic surgery

    Face-lifts, tummy tucks, nose jobs and other cosmetic surgeries cost thousands of dollars that health insurance doesn't cover. But some health plans are now offering a new type of benefit -- access to a list of plastic surgeons who have agreed to reduce their fees.

  • AMA, Wall Street tap into doctors' collective insight via new Web service

    BOSTON -- The American Medical Association is working with a startup company that encourages doctors to swap ideas online and charges investment firms to view postings that could serve as tip-offs to drug side effects and other market-moving medical trends.

  • Can motion sensors, online memory tests help predict Alzheimer's earlier?

    WASHINGTON -- Tiny motion sensors are attached to the walls, doorways and even the refrigerator of Elaine Bloomquist's home, tracking the seemingly healthy 86-year-old's daily activity.

  • Health care no longer political minefield

    WASHINGTON -- During the 13 years since President Bill Clinton lost his bid to remake the U.S. health-care system, and helped cost his party control of Congress in the bargain, politicians have shied from changing it more than one step at a time even as costs and the ranks of uninsured have ballooned.

Archived Reports

Who's Who in Health Care - 2006

This special report takes an in-depth look at health care leaders and administrators, trends, emerging treatments, insurance issues and more. A roundtable discussion featuring several medical leaders highlights some of the important current issues in the county and nation.

Who's Who in Health Care - 2005

In this annual report, we explore how San Diego's dynamic health care industry continues to attract top talent from around the world. We'll look at health care leaders and administrators, new trends in health care programs, new facilities, legal issues and more.