Our special series continues with a look at employment law and legal education.

  • Expert Insights: Employment law

    The past decade was relatively quiet for major employment regulations, including federal and state statutes, administrative regulations and judicial decisions. However, 2009 saw sweeping changes, and this year is expected to bring more. The Daily Transcript invited four San Diego employment law leaders to share their insights on what the upcoming employment law landscape will look like -- and the potential impact of anticipated changes.

  • Cal Western professor champions rule of law, creative problem solving

    James Cooper, a.k.a. Globoguy, takes a cadre of California Western law students on a field trip to Fashion Valley. Their mission? To uncover child labor used to make goods sold at department stores.

  • Lawmakers call for restrictions on political ads

    WASHINGTON -- Corporations and unions would have to identify themselves on political ads they bankroll, and the CEO or top official would have to make "I approve this message" statements under legislation introduced in Congress last week.

  • Could immigration furor create positive evolution?

    Two decades ago, when Arizona voters rejected a holiday to honor slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., the NFL yanked the lucrative Super Bowl football championship game from suburban Phoenix. The boycott marked a major turning point in the journey to nationwide acceptance of the King holiday.

  • Call center suit raises privacy questions

    BEND, Ore. -- Two women have filed a $250,000 wrongful termination suit against a major Bend employer that raises questions about workplace privacy, confidentiality and how employers handle investigations into potential misconduct.

  • Connecticut woman alleges genetic discrimination at work

    HARTFORD, Conn. -- A Connecticut woman who had a voluntary double mastectomy after genetic testing is alleging her employer eliminated her job after learning she carried a gene implicated in breast cancer.

  • 'Greeter' becomes face of fight vs. Wal-Mart

    PITTSBURG, Calif. -- As a "greeter," the cheerful Betty Dukes is one of the first employees customers usually see as they walk through the front doors of the Wal-Mart store here.

  • Paralegals look to the future

    Although the economy may be struggling, paralegals are carving a niche and finding themselves more indispensable than ever. While we most often think of paralegals as supporting attorneys in a law firm, the truth is that many individuals with a paralegal education are also working in the corporate world, government agencies and even branching out on their own.

  • Thomas Jefferson School of Law: New community partner for East Village, downtown

    In just a few short months, Thomas Jefferson School of Law will take up residence in its brand new campus with the iconic chevron-shaped roof at Island and Park in the East Village and become a significant community partner in downtown San Diego. The law school will offer much more to the community than a great opportunity to earn a J.D. or LL.M. degree at an ABA- accredited institution when the doors of the eight-story, 178,000-square-foot facility open in January 2011.

  • Recession spurs interest in law school

    Though the job market for lawyers has been hit hard by the recession in recent years, dim hiring prospects have not done much to discourage the thousands who are signing up at area law schools to become the next generation of attorneys.

  • Employers should exercise legal caution when using cost-saving strategies to avoid layoffs

    Taking a mid-career sabbatical or clearing those unused vacation days off the work calendar used to have a positive impact on employees. But with today’s high unemployment and tough economic times, furlough days and reduced work schedules are instant stress-inducers for recession-wary workers.

  • Supreme Court case takes look at employee privacy

    A current U.S. Supreme Court case is a reminder for employers that they can’t be protected by their written policy if it’s not applied consistently.

Law Week - Wednesday

Roundtables

Profiles

National News

  • Lawmakers call for restrictions on political ads

    WASHINGTON -- Corporations and unions would have to identify themselves on political ads they bankroll, and the CEO or top official would have to make "I approve this message" statements under legislation introduced in Congress last week.

  • Could immigration furor create positive evolution?

    Two decades ago, when Arizona voters rejected a holiday to honor slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., the NFL yanked the lucrative Super Bowl football championship game from suburban Phoenix. The boycott marked a major turning point in the journey to nationwide acceptance of the King holiday.

  • Call center suit raises privacy questions

    BEND, Ore. -- Two women have filed a $250,000 wrongful termination suit against a major Bend employer that raises questions about workplace privacy, confidentiality and how employers handle investigations into potential misconduct.

  • Connecticut woman alleges genetic discrimination at work

    HARTFORD, Conn. -- A Connecticut woman who had a voluntary double mastectomy after genetic testing is alleging her employer eliminated her job after learning she carried a gene implicated in breast cancer.

  • 'Greeter' becomes face of fight vs. Wal-Mart

    PITTSBURG, Calif. -- As a "greeter," the cheerful Betty Dukes is one of the first employees customers usually see as they walk through the front doors of the Wal-Mart store here.

Containing Report

Law Week 2010

From May 3 to May 7, The Daily Transcript honors Law Week with a weeklong series honoring the business of law. Coverage includes attorney profiles, Q&As with San Diego legal experts, and stories on important issues like patent reform, bankruptcy, employment law, and corporate litigation.

Companion Reports

Law Week - Friday - 2010

This weeklong series honoring the business of law in San Diego concludes with with a look at intellectual property and patent law.

Law Week - Thursday - 2010

This Law Week special report features real estate and construction law.

Law Week - Tuesday - 2010

Probate law, alternative fees and diversity are some of the topics covered in today's special report honoring the business of law.

Law Week - Monday - 2010

This weeklong series focusing on the business of law in San Diego kicks off with a look at corporate law, e-discovery, social media, a Q&A with local attorneys and more.

Archived Reports

Law Week 2010

From May 3 to May 7, The Daily Transcript honors Law Week with a weeklong series honoring the business of law. Coverage includes attorney profiles, Q&As with San Diego legal experts, and stories on important issues like patent reform, bankruptcy, employment law, and corporate litigation.