This weeklong series honoring the business of law in San Diego concludes with with a look at intellectual property and patent law.

  • Manufacturer, not buyer, beware: $500 per SKU for falsely marking patents

    The ubiquitous coffee cup lid was at the center of a legal storm recently. Solo Cup Co. marked billions of plastic cold- and hot-drink cup lids with patent numbers, despite knowing that the patents had expired.

  • Expert Insights: Intellectual property

    In an increasingly global and competitive market, intellectual property may be a business' most valuable asset. Today's executives must address the protection and most effective use of technology and intangible assets, patents, trademarks and copyrights. The Daily Transcript asked several attorneys specializing in IP law to answer questions about one of the fastest-growing practice areas.

  • Local lawyers take their practice to new level of ‘action’

    Shaun White, Tony Hawk and Kelly Slater are household names. Snowboarding and freestyle skiing are Olympic events.

  • Orchardist discovers new cherry variety

    WENATCHEE, Wash. -- For Stemilt Hill cherry grower Gordy Goodwin, persistence is paying off. It was about eight years ago that Goodwin noticed one of his newly planted cherry trees was different than the rest.

  • Wisconsin legalization of raw milk seen as benchmark

    MADISON, Wis. -- Proponents of unpasteurized milk hope a victory in "America's Dairyland" will encourage other states to legalize sales and make it more available nationwide.

  • Car bomb suspect cooperates, but motive mystery

    NEW YORK -- A man accused of trying to detonate a car bomb in Times Square had found the stable, suburban life he had spent a decade working toward, then abandoned his house in Connecticut and decided to supplement his business degrees with explosives training in Pakistan, authorities say.

  • Journalists file lawsuit in GOP convention arrests

    MINNEAPOLIS -- Amy Goodman, host of the syndicated "Democracy Now!" news program, and two of her producers filed suit against the cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis and other defendants Wednesday over their arrests while covering the 2008 Republican National Convention.

  • 2 Arizona city councils vote to sue over new law

    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- The Tucson and Flagstaff city councils voted Tuesday to sue Arizona over its tough new immigration law, citing concerns about enforcement costs and negative effects on the state's tourism industry.

  • Wisconsin loses round in stem cell patent battle

    MADISON, Wis. --Consumer groups challenging a key patent covering embryonic stem cell research pioneered at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have won an appeal overturning an earlier rejection of their claims.

  • Bear Stearns execs challenged on failure

    WASHINGTON -- Members of a special panel investigating the financial crisis on Wednesday challenged former Bear Stearns' executives on their view of what caused the big Wall Street firm to implode two years ago.

  • Appeals court weighs D.C. gay marriage challenge

    WASHINGTON -- The conflict between direct democracy and the need to protect the rights of minorities took center stage Tuesday as the D.C. Court of Appeals heard arguments over an effort to put a same-sex marriage ban before the city's voters.

  • High court turns down Delaware over sports betting

    DOVER, Del. -- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal in which Delaware sought to expand its sports betting lottery beyond professional football.

  • NY court: Author likely to lose 'Catcher' fight

    NEW YORK -- A Swedish author is unlikely to win approval through the courts to publish his novel in the United States, because it is substantially similar to J.D. Salinger's "The Catcher in the Rye," an appeals court said last Friday.

  • Jury analyst, attorneys see more hacking cases

    KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- Look for an increase in computer hacking trials, like the one involving Sarah Palin's e-mail account.

  • E-mail privacy rights hinge on company policy details

    If you are working for company A and using its equipment to apply for a job at company B, then you could get fired -- even if all you did was use the copy machine to make copies of your resume.

  • Proactive approach can help companies prevent IP theft

    Technology advances have made life a lot easier for companies in today’s competitive business environment.

  • Global IP theft on the rise; poses threat to public security, health, safety

    Intellectual property theft has become a massive, sophisticated global business involving the manufacturing of counterfeit versions of everything from shoes, perfume, vodka and cigarettes to toys, jeans and razors. Since 1992 the global trade in illegitimate goods has increased from $5.5 billion to approximately $600 billion and represents 5 percent to 7 percent of world trade annually.

Law Week - Friday

Profiles

National News

  • Orchardist discovers new cherry variety

    WENATCHEE, Wash. -- For Stemilt Hill cherry grower Gordy Goodwin, persistence is paying off. It was about eight years ago that Goodwin noticed one of his newly planted cherry trees was different than the rest.

  • Wisconsin legalization of raw milk seen as benchmark

    MADISON, Wis. -- Proponents of unpasteurized milk hope a victory in "America's Dairyland" will encourage other states to legalize sales and make it more available nationwide.

  • Car bomb suspect cooperates, but motive mystery

    NEW YORK -- A man accused of trying to detonate a car bomb in Times Square had found the stable, suburban life he had spent a decade working toward, then abandoned his house in Connecticut and decided to supplement his business degrees with explosives training in Pakistan, authorities say.

  • Journalists file lawsuit in GOP convention arrests

    MINNEAPOLIS -- Amy Goodman, host of the syndicated "Democracy Now!" news program, and two of her producers filed suit against the cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis and other defendants Wednesday over their arrests while covering the 2008 Republican National Convention.

  • 2 Arizona city councils vote to sue over new law

    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- The Tucson and Flagstaff city councils voted Tuesday to sue Arizona over its tough new immigration law, citing concerns about enforcement costs and negative effects on the state's tourism industry.

Containing Report

Law Week 2010

From May 3 to May 7, The Daily Transcript honors Law Week with a weeklong series honoring the business of law. Coverage includes attorney profiles, Q&As with San Diego legal experts, and stories on important issues like patent reform, bankruptcy, employment law, and corporate litigation.

Companion Reports

Law Week - Thursday - 2010

This Law Week special report features real estate and construction law.

Law Week - Wednesday - 2010

Our special series continues with a look at employment law and legal education.

Law Week - Tuesday - 2010

Probate law, alternative fees and diversity are some of the topics covered in today's special report honoring the business of law.

Law Week - Monday - 2010

This weeklong series focusing on the business of law in San Diego kicks off with a look at corporate law, e-discovery, social media, a Q&A with local attorneys and more.

Archived Reports

Law Week 2010

From May 3 to May 7, The Daily Transcript honors Law Week with a weeklong series honoring the business of law. Coverage includes attorney profiles, Q&As with San Diego legal experts, and stories on important issues like patent reform, bankruptcy, employment law, and corporate litigation.