This Law Week special report features corporate law, bankruptcy and the economy.

  • Smaller law firms positioned to withstand recession

    Despite the fact that large law firms were some of the first high-profile businesses to implode in the troubled economy, many small and mid-sized law firms are doing well, especially compared to their super-sized counterparts.

  • Skepticism at high court on voting rights measure

    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court's conservative justices led a sustained attack Wednesday on a key element of the Voting Rights Act, questioning whether one-time bastions of segregation still should be held to account for past discrimination.

  • House panel to vote to outlaw 'liar loans'

    WASHINGTON -- A House panel was expected to approve legislation Wednesday that would outlaw the kind of "liar loans" and other questionable bank practices that helped drag down the economy.

  • Citi asks Treasury if it can pay bonuses

    NEW YORK (AP) -- Citigroup Inc. (NYSE: C), which has received $45 billion in federal bailout funds and potentially could have to raise more capital based on "stress test" results, is requesting permission from the Treasury Department to pay out special bonuses to certain workers, The Wall Street Journal said late Tuesday.

  • Defendant loses case over jailhouse informants

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court has made it harder for defendants to keep their comments to jailhouse informants from being used against them at trial.

  • Judge delays Google book settlement hearing

    NEW YORK (AP) -- The federal court overseeing Google Inc.'s (Nasdaq: GOOG) settlement over its book-scanning program is giving authors four more months to opt out of the deal and review its potential pitfalls.

  • Obama seeks to change crack sentences

    WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration joined a federal judge Wednesday in urging Congress to end a racial disparity by equalizing prison sentences for dealing and using crack versus powdered cocaine.

  • Fed court revives rendition lawsuit against Boeing

    SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal appeals court on Tuesday ruled that a subsidiary of Chicago-based Boeing Co. (NYSE: BA) can be sued for allegedly flying terrorism suspects to secret prisons around the world to be tortured as part of the CIA's "extraordinary rendition" program.

  • Dog and pony show for the digital age

    Studies show the majority of jurors reach a preliminary determination on behalf of plaintiff or defendant at the conclusion of opening statements, and 80 percent of those jurors retain that determination at the conclusion of trial. These statistics make clear the necessity of a powerful and persuasive opening statement; and in turn, the growing popularity and success of trial presentation technology in the courtroom. Indeed, today's pervasive multimedia-based communication combined with television shows such as "C.S.I." and "Law & Order" have raised juror expectations.

  • Beware of foreclosure scams

    As if the possibility of losing one's home in a foreclosure isn't scary enough, the thought of being a victim of a foreclosure rescue scam is even worse. Foreclosure rescue scams have been on the rise due to the increase in home foreclosures.

  • Ex-American Home CEO settles with SEC for $2.45 million

    WASHINGTON -- The former head of American Home Mortgage Investment Corp. has agreed to pay nearly $2.5 million to settle federal civil charges of accounting fraud and concealing the company's deteriorating finances as the subprime mortgage crisis hit in 2007.

  • White man's burden? Discrimination suits flourish

    The issue of reverse discrimination first reached the nation's highest court in the 1970s, when a student with good grades named Allan Bakke accused a University of California medical school of twice denying him admission because he was white.

  • EXPERT INSIGHTS: Corporate/bankruptcy law

    The effects of an uncertain financial landscape have rippled through the economy, with broad implications for business entities and the law firms that represent them. With federal regulation and some business transactions on the increase, many companies will seek out the help of corporate attorneys. The Daily Transcript asked local attorneys to share their expertise on the legal consequences of running a business during these tough times.

  • Status of Federal Estate Tax -- planning opportunities in a down economy

    Almost 220 years ago, Benjamin Franklin wrote "Nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes." These words still ring true today. The Federal Estate Tax (commonly referred to as the "death tax") is scheduled for repeal as of Jan. 1, 2010.

  • Economic recovery: Lessons from antitrust history

    It is an understatement to say the economic and banking crisis, and even the future of capitalism and free markets, have been in the headlines lately. Regulation -- governmental control of business behavior -- is being discussed to an extent unimaginable in the last 30 years. On March 17, the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Courts and Competition Policy held hearings on "Too Big to Fail and the Role of Antitrust Law." The consensus, not surprisingly, was that antitrust had a significant role to play in the economic recovery.

Law Week - Thursday

Profiles

National News

  • Skepticism at high court on voting rights measure

    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court's conservative justices led a sustained attack Wednesday on a key element of the Voting Rights Act, questioning whether one-time bastions of segregation still should be held to account for past discrimination.

  • House panel to vote to outlaw 'liar loans'

    WASHINGTON -- A House panel was expected to approve legislation Wednesday that would outlaw the kind of "liar loans" and other questionable bank practices that helped drag down the economy.

  • Citi asks Treasury if it can pay bonuses

    NEW YORK (AP) -- Citigroup Inc. (NYSE: C), which has received $45 billion in federal bailout funds and potentially could have to raise more capital based on "stress test" results, is requesting permission from the Treasury Department to pay out special bonuses to certain workers, The Wall Street Journal said late Tuesday.

  • Defendant loses case over jailhouse informants

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court has made it harder for defendants to keep their comments to jailhouse informants from being used against them at trial.

  • Judge delays Google book settlement hearing

    NEW YORK (AP) -- The federal court overseeing Google Inc.'s (Nasdaq: GOOG) settlement over its book-scanning program is giving authors four more months to opt out of the deal and review its potential pitfalls.

Containing Report

Law Week 2009

From April 27 to May 1, The Daily Transcript celebrates Law Week with a weeklong series honoring the business of law. Coverage includes attorney profiles, Q&As with San Diego legal experts on a variety of topics, and coverage of hot issues like patent reform, employment law, and real estate law.

Companion Reports

Law Week - Friday - 2009

This weeklong series honoring the business of law in San Diego culminates with a look at clean tech and environmental law.

Law Week - Wednesday - 2009

Today's special report takes a closer look at business and employment law.

Law Week - Tuesday - 2009

Intellectual property and education are some of the topics covered in today's special report honoring the business of law.

Law Week - Monday - 2009

This weeklong series focusing on the business of law in San Diego kicks off with a look at the construction and real estate legal arenas, including a Q&A with local attorneys.

Archived Reports

Law Week 2009

From April 27 to May 1, The Daily Transcript celebrates Law Week with a weeklong series honoring the business of law. Coverage includes attorney profiles, Q&As with San Diego legal experts on a variety of topics, and coverage of hot issues like patent reform, employment law, and real estate law.