Join us as we explore Health & Wellness, in the workplace and at home. 

  • San Diego medical entrepreneurs seek louder voice in health care debate

    Medical device entrepreneurs and startup companies feeling left out of the health care reform debate have established a new advocacy group. The goal is to educate policy makers about the possibly far-reaching impacts of pending reform on their life-saving and health-improving products.

  • Jondall to chair American Heart Association's 2010 Go Red For Women Luncheon

    The American Heart Association's San Diego Division is excited to have Deborah Jondall as chair of the American Heart Association's 2010 Go Red For Women Luncheon.

  • A working model for health care

    Health care reform has moved to the back burner on the president's agenda. With all the backroom partisan finagling, voluminous reform content and congressional realignments that tilt votes in one direction to another, it's hard to say when and if the Health Care Reform Bill will pass.

  • New technologies could improve patient care, cut costs

    Wireless health care is on the rise, and with continued technological advancements and adherence to a few guiding principles, it could lead to better quality of life for patients, reduced hospital costs and earlier detection of medical problems, panelists said during a Feb. 4 discussion at West 2010.

  • Love your heart: Tips for daily living

    Make easy lifestyle changes

  • Heart attack warning signs for women

    Some heart attacks are sudden and intense, but most of them start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often the people affected aren't sure what's wrong and wait too long before getting help. Here are some of the signs that can mean a heart attack is happening:

  • American Heart Association sets 2020 impact goal

    For the first time, the American Heart Association has defined "ideal cardiovascular health," identifying seven health factors and lifestyle behaviors that support heart health.

  • AHA kicks off Go Red For Women campaign

    The 2010 San Diego Go Red For Women campaign kicked off across San Diego County Feb. 4, as locations across the region agreed to "Go Red" in support of the campaign.

  • Efforts to reduce cardiovascular disease working

    In 2009, it was announced that cardiovascular disease is no longer the leading cause of death in San Diego County. During the past five years, there has been a 13 percent decrease in the number of deaths caused by cardiovascular disease in San Diego County, and a staggering 26 percent drop in the number of lives claimed by stroke in the county.

  • Bringing better health to the workplace

    Most businesses recognize their employees' health and well being is key to productivity and business success. That's why businesses are investing in worksite wellness programs that help improve employee health, boost performance and reduce health care costs. In fact, the question for most companies is not whether to have a wellness program, but rather how to implement one successfully.

  • Healthy baby campaign uses texts to reach mothers

    WASHINGTON -- Expectant mothers are getting a new tool to help keep themselves and their babies healthy: pregnancy tips sent directly to their cell phones.

  • Boosting bottom line, employee morale with a wellness program

    With more and more companies experiencing increases in their health care costs, corporate wellness programs are gaining momentum as a means to both control health care costs and increase the productivity and morale of employees. By promoting and incenting healthier lifestyles for their employees, employers can directly impact both absenteeism and productivity.

  • Scripps Wellness program rewards employees for healthy behavior

    The Scripps Wellness program helps employees learn how to take small steps to improve their health and rewards them with reduced insurance premiums. By registering on the Scripps Wellness Web site and creating a profile, employees and their families have personalized health information and resources to support healthy goals such as weight loss, increased physical activity, healthy eating, stress reduction and quitting smoking. About 12,700 employees participate in the program. Employee wellness benefits include:

  • Pressure rises to stop antibiotics in agriculture

    FRANKENSTEIN, Mo. -- The mystery started the day farmer Russ Kremer got between a jealous boar and a sow in heat.

  • Wellness at American Heart Association's San Diego division

    The American Heart Association's San Diego division takes health and wellness seriously. It is important to be both a resource and an example to others when it comes to addressing company health and wellness.

  • General Lock creates a wellness culture

    The last several benefit renewals leading up to 2008 felt like Groundhog Day each time for the General Lock & Clark Security Products executives. Faced with double-digit medical premium increases and little or no utilization information, the only options in offsetting some of the additional expense to the company were increasing co-pays, reducing benefits and increasing payroll deductions.

  • Active Network encourages its own employees to get active

    As a company that provides technology solutions, marketing services and online media properties that enable and encourage participation in activities and events, Active Network not only provides external services to promote a fit planet, but has long been a company that encourages its own employees to pursue an active, healthy lifestyle.

  • Stem cell research: Living up to its potential

    Human embryonic stem cell research has long been described with words like "potential" and "someday," words that reflect the technology's promise, but a promise to be kept in the future.

  • Wellness programs help employers manage costs

    UnitedHealthcare's health and wellness programs help employers and employees achieve and maintain a healthy and balanced lifestyle. By working collaboratively with employers, UnitedHealthcare helps implement wellness programs that feature interactive tools, resources, information and online programs. These programs help improve the health and well-being of employees, while also helping employers more effectively manage health care costs.

  • Upstream medicine: Case for prescriptive health-related behaviors

    The current secretary general of the World Council on Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation likes to tell the story of a young cardiologist. He was standing on the edge of a riverbank enjoying the view when he spotted a man flailing in the water, being carried down the rapids toward a 1,000-foot waterfall. He immediately took his shoes off, jumped into the river, and pulled the man to safety.

  • Stakes high for California in health care reform

    SAN FRANCISCO -- Among states, California arguably has the most to gain from an overhaul of its health care system: It has the greatest number of uninsured residents in the country and the largest public insurance program for the poor, which struggles to serve 6.5 million people while reimbursing doctors at one of the nation's lowest rates.

  • A strategic framework for health improvement in San Diego County

    Lately, there has been much talk and action in Washington, D.C., regarding health care reform, and some of the reform talk has focused on prevention and proactive intervention. While we care about health care coverage, which is the main thrust of the federal debate, prevention can be the key to reforming the health of the San Diego community. To see the possibilities for transforming the health of all San Diegans, one need only examine these three numbers: 3, 4 and 50.

Wellness in the Workplace

Roundtables

Profiles

  • Skilled negotiator steering Tri-City out of troubled waters

    When Larry Anderson walked in the door as interim CEO of Tri-City Medical Center in January 2009, the Oceanside hospital was losing $1.5 million a month, paying 17 percent interest on debt of nearly $70 million and staring at a 2013 deadline to close its doors, since its buildings were not compliant with state earthquake standards.

National News

  • Healthy baby campaign uses texts to reach mothers

    WASHINGTON -- Expectant mothers are getting a new tool to help keep themselves and their babies healthy: pregnancy tips sent directly to their cell phones.

  • Pressure rises to stop antibiotics in agriculture

    FRANKENSTEIN, Mo. -- The mystery started the day farmer Russ Kremer got between a jealous boar and a sow in heat.

  • Stakes high for California in health care reform

    SAN FRANCISCO -- Among states, California arguably has the most to gain from an overhaul of its health care system: It has the greatest number of uninsured residents in the country and the largest public insurance program for the poor, which struggles to serve 6.5 million people while reimbursing doctors at one of the nation's lowest rates.

Archived Reports

Wellness in the Workplace - 2011

Find out what local executives have to say about the ongoing health care debate and how it will affect employers.

Wellness in the Workplace - Innovations in Health

Join in our discussion with the industry’s big players and learn what’s in store for 2010 and beyond.

Wellness in the Workplace

Learn how San Diego companies are promoting health and wellness among their employees with innovative programs.