Improving your odds for picking the right wine

January 19, 2015

I’ve tried and even paid for wine apps that promised to help me select a great bottle or glass of wine, yet have been consistently disappointed. The Wine Spectator app, for example, charges $5 per month to access its wine ratings, but more often than not a search for a particular wine brings up a not-found message. Other apps let you take a picture of the label to access a review, but the results are much the same: wine not found.

But now that’s all changed. I’ve been trying an app called Vivino (www.vivino.com), and have been delighted and amazed at how well it works. The app was created in Copenhagen in 2011 and Vivino now has an office in San Francisco with just five employees. It’s free for both the iPhone and Android phones and works the same way on each.

You start by taking a picture of a wine label that’s sent to Vivino. A few seconds later, a scrollable page opens with information about the wine, including a picture of the label, a 1 to 5 rating from other users who have rated it, average price, detailed reviews, a comparison with other vintages and recommended food pairings. You can also enter your own review and add notes for future reference.

I tried the app on about 20 different bottles; 16 were identified immediately and four required a delay for manual matching. Three of the four came back in a few minutes, and one never did (a Vosne Romanee). My test included a wide variety of wines from around the world and a couple of small family wineries.

What makes Vivino stand apart from other wine apps is the number of users — 8 million who have scanned in and reviewed 100 million bottles of wine. Of these 100 million reviews, there are 5 million unique wines in the database.

I spoke with Steven Favrot, Vivino’s vice president of marketing, who said their users are increasing faster than any other wine app — 15,000 to 20,000 per day. With so many users — he estimates 20 times more than any other app — there’s a high likelihood that many users have reviewed the wine you’re checking. Typically, there were as many as 10 or more ratings, making the results more meaningful.

If you ever perused a wine list in a restaurant trying to decide which wine to order, a second feature in this app can help you choose. Take a picture of a restaurant’s wine list and in a few seconds, that image will come back with ratings superimposed next to each wine on the list. That solves the dilemma of trying to find a wine with a high rating at an affordable price. This feature also worked for me when I took a picture of a wine list off my computer screen.

With that said, it’s likely you can get more nuanced opinions from a fine restaurant’s sommelier who’s much more familiar with the selections on the wine list or, if listed, from a publication such as Wine Spectator, where the tasting is done by professionals.

In fact, Vivino’s newly announced Premium version will add these reviews. For $5 a month or $49.95 per year, you can have them deliver a biweekly Wine Buying Guide. The guide tailors the report to your needs and includes access to up-to-date pricing from more than 50,000 merchants worldwide through Wine Searcher. It also adds expert wine reviews from Robert Parker, Wine Spectator and so on, and helps you keep track of your wine cellar.

Vivino is a perfect example of the value of crowdsourcing, where a large population of users benefits each member, much as Amazon does for product reviews and Waze does for traffic conditions. Based on my use, Vivino improves the odds of choosing a wine of your liking and price point, whether in a restaurant or in a wine store. But don’t ignore recommendations from a store’s employees, restaurant’s sommeliers and other experts.


Baker is the author of "From Concept to Consumer," published by Financial Times Press. Send comments to phil.baker@sddt.com. Comments may be published online or as Letters to the Editor.

More Phil Baker Columns

Improving your odds for picking the right wine

I’ve tried and even paid for wine apps that promised to help me select a great bottle or glass of wine, yet have been consistently disappointed. The Wine Spectator app, for example, charges $5 per month to access its wine ratings, but more often than not a search for a particular wine brings up a not-found message. Other apps let you take a picture of the label to access a review, but the results are much the same: wine not found.

What I saw at CES 2015

I spent last week in Las Vegas at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) along with 170,000 others, making this the biggest show ever. Tens of thousands of new products were displayed by 3,600 exhibitors spread over 2.2 million square feet of exhibit space, primarily at two huge convention centers, Las Vegas Convention Center and the Sands.

The year of the smartwatch

Prepare yourself for the onslaught of smartwatches. Not since the introduction of the tablet has there been so much excitement and promise of a new product category.

Trends and predictions for 2015

What can we expect in the world of consumer technology in 2015? Here’s my annual assessment and predictions.

San Diego Stock Exchange

U.S. Markets

Index Value Change
{{name}} {{value}} {{daychange}}
Updated: -/-/---- -:-- --

San Diego Stock Exchange

Best Performers

Company $ Chg % Chg
{{companysymbol}} {{changefrom}} {{percentchange}}

Worst Performers

Company $ Chg % Chg
{{companysymbol}} {{changefrom}} {{percentchange}}
Updated: -/-/---- -:-- --
Subscribe Today!