Comcast’s campaign to undermine net neutrality

July 21, 2014

Net neutrality means that the Internet service providers (ISPs) treat all data that travels over their networks in exactly the same way. It’s the way the Internet has worked since its inception and has transformed our lives in nearly everything we do. It’s also spawned innovation to create products and services we never imagined.

But there’s an effort underway to change the way it's been working that will benefit a few large ISPs at the expense of the public and other businesses. This change is being led by FCC chairman Tom Wheeler, a former lobbyist for Comcast appointed by President Barack Obama.

His proposal is to change the equal-access provision and set up two classes of service, one that provides faster speeds and better access to those websites that pay, and a slower access speed for those that don’t want to pay.

Comcast is one of the strongest advocates for this change and would be one of the companies to benefit the most from it; if Comcast succeeds in buying Time Warner Cable, it would control a third of the high-speed Internet market. Since few of us have more than a single choice of high-speed Internet service providers, the purchase would extend its reach even further.

But Comcast has one problem: It is constantly in the running for being the most hated company in America. This year the company won that title in a contest conducted by the consumer site www.theconsumerist.com, owned by Consumer Reports. A phone call last week that made news all over the Web demonstrated why they are so disliked.

Ryan Block, a friend of mine who co-founded the gadget website Engadget, and his wife, Veronica Belmont, were recently trying to cancel their Comcast cable account, but the customer service agent had no interest in accommodating them. Even though they had already signed up for a new service, the rep refused to allow them to cancel.

Ryan writes, “The representative continued aggressively repeating his questions, despite the answers given, to the point where my wife became so visibly upset she handed me the phone. Overhearing the conversation, I knew this would not be very fun.

“What I did not know is how oppressive this conversation would be. Within just a few minutes the representative had gotten so condescending and unhelpful I felt compelled to record the speakerphone conversation on my other phone.”

“This recording (http://time.com/2985964/comcast-cancel-ryan-block/) picks up roughly 10 minutes into the call, whereby she and I have already given a myriad of reasons and explanations as to why we are canceling (which is why I simply stopped answering the reps repeated question — it was clear the only sufficient answer was "OK, please don't disconnect our service after all.")

Even at the end of the call when the agent finally gave up, he refused to provide any cancellation number or confirmation of the call.

Comcast issued a statement saying, “We are very embarrassed by the way our employee spoke with Mr. Block and are contacting him to personally apologize. The way in which our representative communicated with him is unacceptable and not consistent with how we train our customer service representatives.

“We are investigating this situation and will take quick action. While the overwhelming majority of our employees work very hard to do the right thing every day, we are using this very unfortunate experience to reinforce how important it is to always treat our customers with the utmost respect.”

Consumerist.com reported that it, “Has heard from Comcast call center workers, both past and present, who agree that maybe while this guy went a bit far, it’s only because that’s the culture at the company, and that customer service reps are actually trained to do just what he did. … As multiple tipsters are telling us, CSRs can only have a certain amount of “discos” — or disconnects — on their personal tallies each day, and must meet a certain quota of “saves,” for which they can earn bonuses and/or commission.”

This is the same company that wants to insert itself in one of the country’s most precious assets.

Nearly every company and organization in the technology sector, as well as a large majority of the population, is opposed to these changes proposed by the FCC. How much do people care? When comedian John Oliver explained on HBO’s “Last Week Tonight” what was being proposed, it generated 45,000 near instant responses to the FCC.

The FCC has received more than 1 million comments from the public regarding its proposed net neutrality rules. According to the FCC’s Gigi Sohn, 1,030,000 comments had been submitted by noon Friday on the East Coast.

Opposition is also coming from the major technology companies such as Amazon, Google, Facebook and Netflix that have petitioned the FCC to drop their plans. The Internet Association, the organization representing nearly 40 tech companies, including those above, also filed a formal petition in opposition. They want companies to compete by being able to attract customers based on their products and services, not on speed of access.

The FCC has recently begun accepting direct comments from the public. If you are opposed to this new scheme, it’s important to contact the FCC and Congress to let them know. We don't want to hand over control of one of our most important resources to a near-monopoly. Call the FCC at 888-225-5322 or email comments about the net-neutrality plan to openinternet@fcc.gov.


Baker is the author of "From Concept to Consumer," published by Financial Times Press. Send comments to phil.baker@sddt.com. Comments may be published online or as Letters to the Editor.

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