Whatís new in computer luggage?

September 1, 2014

Whatever I'm doing, I always seem to carry more technology gadgets than I need. Even though gadgets have become lighter, my bag has become heavier with many different products. Fortunately, there are some good solutions for dealing with this, as well as for those who want to travel with the smallest possible bag.

On a recent trip to San Francisco, I carried a 13-inch MacBook Pro, an iPad mini, chargers for each, an iPhone 5S, an HTC One M8, a Ricoh GR pocket camera, its charger and an extra battery, a music player, Sennheiser Momentum headphones, numerous cables, a paper notebook, a bunch of pens, keys, business cards, and some reading material.

The challenge is to find a bag that does a good job organizing all the stuff while allowing you to find things quickly. Sometimes too many pockets mean extra searching, while too few mean your items are all mixed together with tangles cords.

One solution can be found in the bags from Glaser Design, a San Francisco company run by Myron and Kari Glaser. Myron told me that a vertical briefcase is an inefficient way to carry technology stuff because everything simply drops to the bottom of the bag.

The company has developed a series of modules designed to precisely fit in Glaser’s bags and allow you to store your items and easily retrieve them. They include translucent zippered organizers for your chargers and small items, a presentation binder for paper, a padded panel with movable pockets for pens, phones and business cards, and a variety of removable pockets for a computer. One even transforms into an under arm portfolio.

Briefcase with modules from Glaser Design. Courtesy photo

While their products are not inexpensive, they are a much better value than designer products that cost even more. Bags begin at about $1,000 and can reach $2000, but they are considered by their worldwide clients to be the best you can buy anywhere. Accessories cost $50 and up, and of course they can be used in any bag. Myron offers free Skype consultation calls in which he will work with you to design a bag for your specific needs. (glaserdesigns.wordpress.com).

Some of the most innovative designs these days are coming from Tumi, which has embraced the needs of technology users. Once known for just a few conservative products such as roller bags and men’s ballistic nylon briefcases with a few pockets, they now offer hundreds of products for men and women designed for carrying technology.

For example, Tumi has developed a line of business-oriented backpacks. One of their newest and best is the Kingsville deluxe brief pack, which is exceptionally lightweight and offers a huge amount of space for items of all shapes and sizes.

The ballistic nylon backpack with leather trim has compartments for up to a 15-inch notebook, an iPad, phones, a large pair of headphones and cameras of all sizes. It’s also designed to slide over the handle of a suitcase, much like a briefcase. With a narrower width than a briefcase, it rolls right down the aisle on top of a suitcase. The 17-inch by 12-inch by 7.25-inch model is much more practical than a briefcase for holding bulky items. (tumi.com) $455.

Looking for a minimalist bag? Waterfield Design in San Francisco just introduced a vertical bag that’s lightweight and fashionable. The VertiGo 2.0 Laptop Bag is more like a large men’s handbag that also can carry your tablet or notebook. It comes in black ballistic, brown waxed canvas, with black or chocolate leather. There’s a front pocket with magnet closure, a zippered inside and two open pockets inside, an open back pocket, and key fob. There are handles and a shoulder strap.

The bag comes in three sizes and costs from $129 to $159 in a choice of colors, and is custom made in 3 days from when you place your order. (www.sfbags.com).

For the minimalist who wants to carry just a notebook and iPad in the smallest size package, look at the Thule Stravan Deluxe Attache Case, available exclusively at Apple Stores. It’s a well-padded case with a plush lining that precisely fits a 13-inch MacBook Pro or Air and an iPad, with separate pockets for the chargers and a phone. It also has tuck-away handles and a shoulder strap. $80.

For a wheeled case, I like the Briggs and Riley U116SP Baseline Rolling Cabin Bag, which offers a huge amount of space to carry your office on the go. Its main compartment is not encumbered by partitions, so you can even carry a briefcase inside. It fits perfectly under an airplane seat and easily glides down airport corridors on four wheels. (www.briggs-riley.com) $349.

Another great choice for a minimalist bag is Levenger’s Bomber Jacket Tech Traveler Briefcase. It’s a compact case made of Levenger’s heavy duty pebbled mocha-colored leather with plaid lining that snuggly fits an iPad, even in a case. It has a soft neoprene interior and several interior pockets, and comes with a shoulder strap and handles. (www.levenger.com) $179.

Searching for the perfect briefcase is an addiction many of us have. Each of these companies offers lots of different bags that will keep that addiction alive.

Baker is the author of "From Concept to Consumer," published by Financial Times Press. Send comments to phil.baker@sddt.com. Comments may be published online or as Letters to the Editor.

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