This weeklong series honoring the business of law in San Diego culminates with a look at clean tech and environmental law.

  • New ad age: Legal quagmires of targeted Internet advertising

    Web users have grudgingly come to expect ads on their favorite Web sites and blogs, even as they read their e-mail. Increasingly, these Web ads are placed strategically to target specific demographics. But while advertisers seek to maximize profits by displaying ads for products or services to consumers that actually want them, Web users tend to be wary of any technology that they believe violates their privacy by "spying" on or tracking their Internet activities. With advancements in Web technology coming at breakneck speed, the holy grail of advertising -- ads targeting not just a broad demographic, but rather the individual consumer most likely to be interested in a specific product or service -- is becoming a reality, and the tension between advertisers and consumers is finding its way into the courts.

  • California adopts nation's first low-carbon fuel rule

    SACRAMENTO -- California air regulators last week adopted a first-in-the nation mandate for low-carbon fuels, telling the petroleum industry it must help combat global warming by offering cleaner-burning alternatives.

  • Acquiring 'broken' condominium projects: Top 10 questions you need to ask

    The real estate boom was fueled, to a large extent, by the sale of condominium conversions, high-rise residential and mixed-use condominiums. As the market decelerated, many of these projects were left with a mix of homeowners who acquired their condominiums in better times and an owner left with unsold units that were vacant or leased. This new ownership structure is often referred to as a "broken" condominium project. What questions should be asked before an acquisition of the unsold units through foreclosure or a bulk sale?

  • EXPERT INSIGHTS: Clean tech/Green law

    Corporate America faces rapidly emerging issues of climate change and energy use. As these issues create both considerable challenges and tremendous opportunities for local tech and biotech companies, San Diego law firms have responded by creating new practice areas in clean tech and green law. The Daily Transcript asked a few local attorneys to share their expertise in this nascent sector.

  • Federal judge refuses to shut down housing camp

    RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- A federal judge refused Thursday to close a migrant encampment on tribal land that's home to thousands of Southern California farmworkers.

  • BLM, Forest Service sued over air pollution

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- Environmentalists are taking aim again at the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management, accusing the agencies in a lawsuit of failing to curb air pollution in the San Juan Basin -- one of the largest natural gas fields in the nation.

  • MGM Mirage, Dubai reach pact to finish CityCenter

    LAS VEGAS -- Casino operator MGM Mirage (NYSE: MGM) said Wednesday that it agreed with partner Dubai World and the pair's lenders to finish an $8.5 billion casino complex on the Las Vegas Strip.

  • LA judge's ruling halts some clean truck rules

    LOS ANGELES (AP) -- A federal judge on Wednesday temporarily halted several requirements of a plan to reduce pollution at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, including a mandate for independent drivers to become employees of trucking companies.

  • Government to propose new rules on workplace safety

    WASHINGTON -- Labor Secretary Hilda Solis said Tuesday that the government would soon propose new safety rules to protect workers from industrial dust that can cause explosions and a popcorn flavoring chemical linked to lung disease.

  • Obama promises major investment in science

    WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama promised a new era of science and technology for the nation, telling the National Academy of Sciences on Monday that he wants to devote more funds to research and development.

  • Cement industry: EPA pollution plan not achievable

    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. -- A federal government plan for cutting emissions of mercury and other air toxins at cement plants is unrealistic and could force some to close, an industry group said Wednesday.

  • Cash management and your law firm: Three key questions to ask your bank

    As the largest bank headquartered in San Diego, California Bank & Trust serves many area law firms. Our experience suggests that there are three key questions you should ask when evaluating a bank's cash management solutions.

  • California appeals court rejects vague, overbroad resolutions of necessity

    Will Rogers, the homespun philosopher, once observed, "The minute you read something you can't understand, you can be sure it was written by a lawyer." Public agency lawyers in eminent domain sometimes try to use vague wording to their advantage -- at least according to a California Court of Appeal. In a recent opinion, the court chastised a city's attorney for using "inscrutable and meaningless" language in a resolution of necessity. (City of Stockton v. Marina Towers LLC, et al., Feb. 13, 2009.)

  • Law firms must establish a metadata policy

    Within all documents and files, there is hidden data called metadata. Although metadata can be useful during the construction and editing of documents, it can also be a real security concern -- one often overlooked by law firms.

  • Construction project risks increase in a difficult economy

    As the construction industry continues to operate in one of the most difficult markets in many decades, the risk of projects failing from a quality, time and cost perspective have increased significantly.

  • Solar lawyers expect to see boom in business

    From wind energy to solar power, President Barack Obama's nearly $800 billion economic stimulus package offers significant support for the nation's renewable-energy industry. Money is now being distributed through the Department of Energy (DOE), which awarded $3.2 billion in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funds for counties, cities, states, territories and tribes on March 26. California alone received more than $351.5 million for local governments to use for projects and programs to reduce total energy use. In San Diego County, more than $21million was allocated.

Profiles

Law Videos

Interview with CBRE's Mike Hoeck

June 29, 2015 -- George Chamberlin and Mike Hoeck, a first vice president with CBRE, discuss how changes in the legal industry and the work environment affect law office space

National News

  • Federal judge refuses to shut down housing camp

    RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- A federal judge refused Thursday to close a migrant encampment on tribal land that's home to thousands of Southern California farmworkers.

  • BLM, Forest Service sued over air pollution

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- Environmentalists are taking aim again at the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management, accusing the agencies in a lawsuit of failing to curb air pollution in the San Juan Basin -- one of the largest natural gas fields in the nation.

  • MGM Mirage, Dubai reach pact to finish CityCenter

    LAS VEGAS -- Casino operator MGM Mirage (NYSE: MGM) said Wednesday that it agreed with partner Dubai World and the pair's lenders to finish an $8.5 billion casino complex on the Las Vegas Strip.

  • LA judge's ruling halts some clean truck rules

    LOS ANGELES (AP) -- A federal judge on Wednesday temporarily halted several requirements of a plan to reduce pollution at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, including a mandate for independent drivers to become employees of trucking companies.

  • Government to propose new rules on workplace safety

    WASHINGTON -- Labor Secretary Hilda Solis said Tuesday that the government would soon propose new safety rules to protect workers from industrial dust that can cause explosions and a popcorn flavoring chemical linked to lung disease.

Containing Report

Law Week 2009

From April 27 to May 1, The Daily Transcript celebrates Law Week with a weeklong series honoring the business of law. Coverage includes attorney profiles, Q&As with San Diego legal experts on a variety of topics, and coverage of hot issues like patent reform, employment law, and real estate law.

Companion Reports

Law Week - Thursday - 2009

This Law Week special report features corporate law, bankruptcy and the economy.

Law Week - Wednesday - 2009

Today's special report takes a closer look at business and employment law.

Law Week - Tuesday - 2009

Intellectual property and education are some of the topics covered in today's special report honoring the business of law.

Law Week - Monday - 2009

This weeklong series focusing on the business of law in San Diego kicks off with a look at the construction and real estate legal arenas, including a Q&A with local attorneys.

Archived Reports

Law Week 2009

From April 27 to May 1, The Daily Transcript celebrates Law Week with a weeklong series honoring the business of law. Coverage includes attorney profiles, Q&As with San Diego legal experts on a variety of topics, and coverage of hot issues like patent reform, employment law, and real estate law.

Subscribe Today!